Telling my story

One of the really great things about Arizona is that in just a few hours you can go from this:

tucson

To this:

Forest lakes

That’s what we did this weekend.  We spent the last two days up near Payson, Arizona attending the annual Payson Round-up.  It’s a huge camping trip that is organized by a local Payson homegroup every year for the last twenty-something years.  This is the first time that we have gone, and we had a great time.  Recovering alcoholics and addicts are my favorite people to hang out with, and there were plenty!  It was a true blessing to see so many people whose lives have been changed by the program of Alcoholics Anonymous.  Just awesome!

It was so nice to get away from home, even for a short trip.  I had an extremely busy week at work because we had classes that started on Monday.  Start weeks are the busiest for me, and I was tired and burned out from working four 10-hour days so that I could take Friday off.  Our four-hour road trip started on Friday morning.  I love road trips!  Especially when I get to travel with my husband, Austin.  We have the best time, laughing and being silly, searching the iPod and the radio for songs to sing along to, telling each other stories from our pasts, and just being tuned into each other.  I will never turn down a road trip with my Honey.

This trip wasn’t a spur of the moment, let’s get out of the heat and see some trees, decision.  We’ve been planning on it for a few months now, because earlier in the year, I was asked to be one of the speakers at the round-up by one of the Payson homegroup members who attends my homegroup when he’s in Tucson.  At these kinds of AA events, there are usually a few members chosen to stand up and share their experience, strength and hope with the other attendees.  At this event, there were four AA speakers and one from Al-Anon.   I really don’t know how I got thrown into that handful, but I did, and I was really honored to be asked.

I have told my story, briefly, a few times at meetings.  But when w arrived on Friday, the organizers told us that they were expecting 350 people on Saturday!  I was speaking at 10:00 Saturday morning, and I was slated to speak for an hour!  And just so you know, I am one of the 75% of people who fear public speaking more than death.  I didn’t know what I gotten myself into.  Standing in front of that many people, baring my soul, was something that I never thought I would volunteer for, no matter how passionate I am about recovery.  Writing this blog allows me to hide behind a computer screen, without worry about judgment or dealing with people face-to-face.  Speaking at regular meetings (which, if I’m honest, I don’t do as often as I would like) isn’t as scary because I know the other members.  But on Friday night, as the nerves set in, I knew that I was in for something that was way out of my comfort zone.  I had trouble getting to sleep that night, which is something that very rarely ever happens to me.  I prayed, as I tried to go to sleep, that God would give me the strength that I needed for the next day, and that He would somehow give me the right words to reach those that needed to hear.

Saturday morning I woke up early and sat outside in the cool mountain air to write in my journal.  I felt surprisingly peaceful and ready for the day.  My fear and nervousness wasn’t gone, but I had faith that things would go well.  We got to the campsite and spent some time drinking coffee and visiting with some of the folks there, the meeting before the meeting, as it’s called.  Then, as the chairman if the event read the AA preamble and everyone started finding their seats, I felt a few pangs of anxiety.  What if I didn’t make sense?  What if I lost my place in my notes?  What if I talked too fast and finished too early?  What if everyone thinks I’m too new in sobriety to offer experience, strength and hope?  My thoughts were all over the place, but focused on me screwing up.  The gentleman that invited me to speak walked up to the mike…oh my gosh, I’ve never used a microphone…and introduced me to the group.  I walked up…

“Good morning, my name is Jami, and I’m an alcoholic….”

I confessed right at the beginning that I was nervous, that I was feeling a little bit pukey, and that I probably should’ve gone pee before getting up there.  That got a laugh, and I felt better.  I started to speak and I was ok, no one was booing, and everyone seemed to be engaged in what I had to say.  And you know what?  I made sense, I didn’t even look at my notes after the first couple of minutes, I spoke for nearly an hour, and I had so many people come up after to thank me and tell me that they identified with my story.  I was able to tell my story, completely and honestly, and I received so many kind words after.  I felt so blessed.

It was an amazing weekend of conquering my fears, trusting God, and carrying the message to other alcoholics.  I can’t imagine anything better.  :)

P.S. My story was recorded, so as soon as I get the recording, I will post it here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Habit #8 – A Month of Breaks (and an update on gratitude)

At the beginning of the year, I decided to try to add healthy habits instead of making resolutions, hoping that at least a few of them will stick and I will end the year healthier than I was at the beginning.  So far, there have been a few that have stuck, and those have made my life healthier and happier.

One day a couple of weeks ago, I was sitting at my desk at work, scarfing down a piece of pizza, trying not to get grease all over a report I was working on, and it hit me –  working through lunches, eating at my desk and not really paying attention to what I was chewing, cannot be healthy.  I had already decided what my healthy habit for August was going to be, but in that moment, I decided to put that one off and remedy my unhealthy lunchtime routine this month instead.  So for this month, the new habit I am going to try out is taking a break.  I am going to actually leave my office and eat my lunch without trying to multi-task my way through it.

This is what I look like at lunch time.

This is what I look like at lunch time.

It turns out that there is a lot of information out there about the benefits of actually stepping away from the office for lunch, and an equal amount of studies and statistics that show just how many employees are not reaping those benefits.  Here is some of what I’ve learned:

  • the typical American lunch break is less than 30 minutes
  • up to two-thirds of workers skip lunch or eat at their desks
  • depending on which study you look at, 18-34 percent of workers always eat at their desks and 16-31 percent reported that they almost always skip lunch in favor of continuing to work
  • the reason that most people cite for not taking time out for lunch is that the demands of work are increasingly high and workplaces are increasingly understaffed

I fall into the eating-at-my-desk category.  Sometimes I pack a lunch, sometimes a coworker runs out and gets us lunch, and sometimes I run next door to Subway, grab a sandwich and settle back in at my desk to eat while I continue to work.  Not stepping away for my break and taking a break from my computer screen makes the day long, and I often feel tired and grumpy in the afternoon.  I may get a couple of extra things done, but am I really more productive than if I took some time out to recharge?  Studies say no. Here are some of the benefits to taking a lunch break:

  • Taking a break restores your psychological resources.  It is a proven way to increase productivity and decision-making and actually improve your mood in the afternoon.
  • It improves your physical health.  There is a lot of medical mumbo-jumbo to support this finding, but what it boils down to is this:  taking a break lowers the release of the stress hormone cortisol, which in turn, lowers your risk of high blood pressure, insomnia, and other related illnesses.
  • Taking a lunch break away from your work surroundings decreases fatigue.  Getting up and walking away for a bit, eating something healthy, and taking some you-time is like pushing a natural reset button.  It revives you for the afternoon, giving you more energy to tackle work issues.

For the past week, I have taken a lunch break each day, and gotten away from my office to do it.  I have noticed that I have more motivation and energy after doing so.  So far, it seems like my productivity has remained the same, but my mood in the afternoon is improved and I don’t feel as worn out by the end of the day.

So for the rest of the month, I am going to make sure that I take a break for lunch each work day, and I will let you know how it goes.

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Update on a month of gratitude:  By far, July’s healthy habit of gratitude is the one that has made the biggest difference for me.  I am continuing to write down the things for which I’m grateful every day in my journal, and doing so has added loads of peace and joy to my life.  Anytime I need a quick change of perspective about a situation, my mind now automatically goes to seeking out the things that make me thankful.  It’s a practice that is definitely becoming a habit.  I call that a win!

Um, yeah…so that happened.

This is not me...it is obviously a much younger, firmer behind than you will find under my skirt.

This is not me…it is obviously a much younger, firmer behind than you will find under my skirt.

 

So today I walked down the hall at work (I work at a college) with my skirt tucked into my underwear.  I was meeting my husband, who is a teacher there, in the student break room for lunch when I made a quick pit-stop to tinkle.  I guess I was in such a hurry to eat that I didn’t do the standard turn-around-and-check-out-my-butt-in-the-mirror that all girls do in the bathroom, and I walked out with half of my butt and my bright green underwear exposed for all the world, or at least anyone in the hallway, to see.  When I got to the break room, I knew something was wrong because as soon as Austin saw me, he started telling me to turn around.  Vehemently and repeatedly.  Now I didn’t know why he was telling me that, but being the obedient wife that I am, I obliged and turned a full circle, ballerina style.  He just kept telling me to turn and I had no idea what he was talking about until he started gesturing at his own butt.  Then the light bulb went on.  Shit.  I reached behind me and, sure enough, my skirt was tucked in my undies.

There was a nano-second of panic as I realized what happened:  I just walked down the hall with my ass hanging out, and then I spun around to make sure no one missed it.  But, as I fixed my wardrobe malfunction, I started to laugh.  And I sat down to post about my hilarious tale of woe on Facebook.  Now this may not seem like a big deal to you, but to me this is close to really freakin’ awesome.  You see, up until just a couple of years ago, this kind of thing would have had me so embarrassed and upset that I’m not sure how I would’ve made it through the rest of the work day.  And one thing I know about the situation is that inadvertently flashing my goodies at people would have definitely been a reason for me to drink.  That sounds silly, I know.  But, believe me, I drank over far lesser things.

So, I’m quite happy about my scandalous, unintentional, flashing.  Not only was it good for a laugh, but it showed me that I am, indeed, making progress in my recovery.  So what if I had to give a few people a sneak-peek to recognize that?  ;)

A Month of Gratitude – Update

Epicurus

For the month of July my Healthy Habit was gratitude.  Each day I focused on the things in my life for which I am grateful, and I did my best to post about it everyday, but I missed a few here and there.  This habit has been, by far, my favorite and my most successful.  After just a few days in, I found that my thinking had changed, and that I was much more optimistic.  When things were good, I took the time to recognize that I was fortunate that they were.  And when situations were bad, I found that looking for something, anything, to be grateful for in the situation, made the bad not so horrible as I thought at first glance.

I read a lot about gratitude, and there seemed to be a lot of blog posts out there that talked about it during the month.  It was inspirational to read what others think about gratitude and what it means to them.  What gratitude means to me is thankfulness, being able to count my blessings and notice the small things that I often overlook, or take for granted.  It means shifting focus from what I am lacking to what I already have, which really is an abundance.  It means learning to be thankful for all the things that I am given, and giving up the sense of entitlement that I have often felt.  Gratitude means changing my perspective, finding the good in every situation.

Research has shown that the practice of gratitude improves the quality of life.  It makes people happier, reduces stress and encourages simplicity.  I found all of those things true as I took time to acknowledge the things for which I am thankful.

If I were to teach someone how to live in gratitude, these are the things that I would emphasize:

  • Be intentional.  Look for things to be grateful for.  Depending on the day and the situation, this can be easy or difficult.  When things are going well, and life is good, it is obviously easier to see things in a positive way.  Finding gratitude in difficult situations is harder, but there is always something there to be thankful for.  My AA sponsor has had me practice this for as long as I can remember – whenever I am down, angry, upset, or depressed, she has me come up with at least a few things that I have to be grateful for.  Doing so has never made my situations worse, they have always gotten better when I take time to be grateful.
  • Don’t focus on what you don’t have.  We live in a society that values ‘more’ and ‘better’.  More money, more friends, better homes, better cars, more things.  Focusing on those things keeps us from being thankful for what we have.  For the past month, I have paid attention to the fact that while I don’t have a long list of friends, or a huge bank account, I do have quality, intimate relationships that I wouldn’t give up for anything, and I have enough money for the things I really need.  Keeping those things in mind keeps me from suffering from unnecessary worry about what I don’t have.
  • Be humble.  Humility and gratitude go hand in hand.  A humble heart finds thankfulness and satisfaction in the gifts that it already has.  It demands less from others and from life itself.
  • Write it down.  When I write my gratitude list (which I will continue to do in my journal, now that July is over), and I can go back and look at what I was grateful for yesterday, last week, last month, it reminds me of what I have to be grateful for today.  There is also something about writing it down, or typing it, that gives it more meaning…it substantiates the feeling.  Give it a try, I promise this is true.

I have been amazed at the difference that the simple act of being grateful can make.  Overall, when I practice gratitude, I am happier and I worry less, I realize that I have everything I need, and I am able to give more of myself to others.  All it takes is finding a little bit of thanks in every situation.

gratitude2

Gratitude – July 29

12 Steps

I tried to post this earlier…really, I did.  No internet connection at home.  Ugh.  What did people do before wi-fi?

Anyway, today I want to express my gratitude for my sobriety and everything that helps me stay sober.  I believe, with all of my heart, that if I hadn’t gotten sober, I would’ve died, either at my own hand, or through crazy, risky behavior like driving in a black out.  I also believe that if I ever pick up again, I will be right back where I was before I stopped some 20 months ago – on the suicide-by-installment plan.   Instead, today, I am able to live my life alcohol-free, mostly drama-free, and with a lot of joy and serenity.

I am grateful for my life of recovery every day, but what brought this to mind specifically was a conversation I had with a friend that I think is on the slippery slope of untreated alcoholism.  I see in her the mood swings that I used to feel myself.  I see the depression that is sometimes obvious, but sometimes just visible under the surface, even though she puts on the facade that everything is okay.  I see and hear the hurt that she feels when she tries to make jokes about her behavior when she’s drinking.  And I see her discomfort when she is seriously hung over, but has to keep going.  So far, she hasn’t suffered any major negative consequences due to her drinking, but as we in recovery know, that just hasn’t happened “yet.”

My friend knows my story, knew me when I relapsed, and saw what I went through on the path to recovery.  I know that sharing my experience, strength, and hope, listening when she needs it, and helping her (if she ever wants help getting sober) is all that I can offer her.  I do hope, though, that she can see that there is a really great, gratitude-filled life on the other side of a life filled with booze.  And I hope she sees it sooner rather than later.

 

So, today I am grateful for….

…sobriety

…Alcoholics Anonymous

…my husband and my sponsor

…good friends who support my recovery

…my fellow bloggers, their blogs, and their comments

…my sponsee, who keeps it fresh for me

…the peace that comes with recovery

…my faith

…the gift of desperation

…my life.

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Please share your gratitude today.

Please share your gratitude today.

Gratitude – July 26

gratitudequotes7

Today I am conscious of my treasures, I have had a truly lovely day full of them.

Here is my gratitude list for today:

  • This morning a good friend of mine had an art show to sell some of her work.  She’s a very talented abstract painter and I have coveted her beautiful work for a long time.  Today, I was able to buy two of her prints (she was selling her work for ‘love contributions’, so buyers paid what they were able to) that I plan to hang in my office at work.  I can’t wait until Monday to see them on my walls.
  • Another good friend of mine went with me to the art show, and she brought her two lovely teenage daughters with us.  I had so much fun with them!!  My friend is one of my closest confidants, and I always feel comfortable talking to her about everything.  I am grateful for the connection that we share.  I thought that perhaps it might be a little bit difficult for me being around teenage girls when I miss my own daughter so much.  But it didn’t turn out that way at all.  I enjoyed being around girls that age again.  They laughed and talked and sang along to the songs on their iPhones that I had never heard.  It was a happy, lively energy that I have really missed.  I’m so thankful that I stayed in the moment and appreciated it for what is was rather than dwell on my past hurts.
  • After that I went with another of my friends to Michael’s to buy frames for my new prints.  It was my lucky day there!  All of the frames were half-off and I found two that were perfect.  My friend and I had a fun time chatting and hunting for stuff for new craft projects.  Again, I was grateful that I was able to enjoy the time with my friend and stay mindful of the good time I was having.

Bernadette's prints

  • I came home to a nice dinner that Austin made, and spent some time with my stepson before he had to leave to go back to his mom’s.  I love the dinners that the three of have together.  It’s really the only time that we use our dining room table (Austin and I usually eat in the living room while we watch shows) and the conversations, while eventually always turning to something gross – I guess that’s what happens when there are two boys at the table – are more focused and meaningful than the typical ones throughout the weekend.  I really like that, and I am grateful for it.

So, my Saturday was filled with friends, fun, family and beautiful things.  How was yours?

Gratitude – July 23

Strawberry Shortcake

Happy Wednesday!  It was a good day today, with much to be grateful for.  It was much like yesterday, and the day before, uneventful, no drama and, really kind of predictable.  I really appreciate looking for, and finding, things to be grateful for on uneventful days.  It takes more careful observation throughout the day and reflection in the evening.  I like that.  It’s like replaying my day, focusing on all of the great things that happened.  That’s a nice thing to do before bedtime. :)

So, here’s my list for today:

  • I am grateful I have so many wonderful friends at work; they brighten my day.  I love the breaks that we take to chat and catch up throughout the work day.  There is always laughter and smiles in my office.
  • I am grateful that this week has been a reprieve from the workload of the previous two weeks.  I have even had enough time to really clean and declutter my office, and now it looks fantastic!  I only wish that I had taken before and after pictures.
  • I am thankful that I haven’t been as tired the last couple of days even though my allergies and sinuses have been bothering me every morning.
  • I am thankful for the month old puppies that are crawling around my living room.  I can just sit and watch them play for hours…they are getting bigger and braver every day.
  • I am grateful for the strawberry shortcake that I made tonight (and had for dinner!).  Tomorrow it’s all salad, all day.
  • I am thankful that by doing my gratitude lists every day (well, almost every day), my mood, perspective, and level of happiness has improved so much.  When I remember how much I have to be thankful for, it always brings me joy.
Austin and puppies

I couldn’t resist posting this picture…see how much I have to be grateful for? :)

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what are you grateful for today